• March 22, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Essential Elements

    essential elementsAt times during your plant’s life, an imbalance of essential trace elements may occur, and we sometimes can’t determine why. Restoring the balance can help alleviate some potential plant health issues linked to trace element deficiencies.

    Your plant may be deficient in one particular nutrient or in a combination of nutrients. When there is a deficiency in one element, this can lead to other elements becoming ‘locked up’ or unavailable to the plant’s roots. Common symptoms of trace elements deficiencies are poor growth, deformed & yellow leaves and deformed fruit. An application of Searles Trace Elements corrects most element deficiencies & restores plant health balance.

    • Premium Blend
    • Broad base element mix containing magnesium, iron, copper, zinc, boron, molybdenum and sulphur.
    • Corrects most element deficiencies.
    • Easy to use.
    • 100% soluble.
  • March 22, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Protect Your Floors

    Protect floors

    protect floorsSoil and moisture from pot plants can create problems if they come in contact with flooring, especially over long periods.

    You should be able to buy pot trays and plastic shields to protect your floor from moisture, abrasion and spillages from indoor plants from your garden centre. Plastic shields are made from barely visible, transparent plastic and can be placed between pots and floor covering. They can also be placed inside woven baskets before pot plants are put inside them to keep the fibres clean and dry.

    If you have any old pieces of carpet lying around unused, sections can be used as coasters to prevent pot holders from scratching or marking polished wood floors. Its even a good idea to glue the carpet permanently to the base of the pot-holder to make it easier when moving/adjusting the pot.

  • March 22, 2021 in Uncategorized

    White Dancing Ladies

    White dancing ladies

    dancing white ladiesGaura are easy to grow and complement many different Australian garden styles across most climatic zones, which makes them very popular perennials.

    As known as ‘Lillipop™ Soda Pop’, Gaura is versatile and can grow equally well in sunny gardens, garden pots and larger baskets. Wands of butterfly-like pure white flowers bloom on the fresh green foliage in abundance during Spring, Summer and Autumn. The flowers dance in any wind that blows, creating a truly delightful effect.

    They are excellent in containers around patios, on terraces and barbeque areas, or sunny garden borders. In sunny areas, plant Gaura in nutrient-rich and free-draining soil. Having mulch around the plant and regularly watering it will encourage great performance from this plant for the first few years. After this time, the established Gaura should require very little water. Prune back if looking shabby to encourage more flowers to develop!

  • March 12, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Garlic Time

    Garlic

    garlic timeIt’s super exciting growing your own garlic and autumn is the peak planting time. Follow our tips to get the best results!

    Garlic, or allium sativum, has been grown for thousands of years for its strong flavour and is a staple ingredient to most cuisine today. Aside from the great flabour it adds to your dish, it’s also well known for its medicinal properties as it’s packed with antioxidants and heaps of vitamins! In the past, it was used as a “wonder-cure” for everything from pimples to the plague.

    Technically garlic is a perennial bulb but is mainly treated as an annual with fresh plantings each year. Planted amongst veggies and under fruit trees the smell may help keep sucking insects at bay as well as warding off any vampires that are lurking around!

    Read more here.

  • March 12, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Spring Bulb Mania

    spring bulb maniaIf you’re a lover of daffodils, tulips, hyacinths and all the other wonderful spring flowering bulbs then now’s the time to act.

    Spring flowering bulbs are super easy to grow and one of the best delights of gardening due to the vibrant array of colours! Who can resist the happy face of a bright yellow daffodil heralding the onset of Spring?

    They come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and can be planted in large groups in the garden or in pots on the patio or balcony. You can even grow some in a bowl without the need for soil at all! Some, like hyacinths, have stunning perfume and many make excellent cut flowers. They’re very versatile and no matter where you live in Australia, there’s a spring flowering bulb that you can enjoy!

    Read more here.

  • March 12, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Dragon Tail Magic

    dragon tail magicHere’s another must have plant for your indoor collection – the irresistible dragon tail!

    Dragon tail, or Epipremnum Pinnatum, is a native plant that once you see, you will definitely want to add to your indoor space due to it’s interesting leaves. When the plants are young, the leaves are glossy and elliptical but as they mature they morph into deeply lobed leaves that resemble a ‘dragon tail’ -if you’re using your imagination!

    The plants produce thick, fleshy stems that will either crawl along the surface of the pot (and beyond!) or climb up a totem if you provide it. One thing to remember is to keep these plants away from small hand and furry paws, are all parts are toxic.

    Read more here.

  • March 12, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Delicious Passionfruit

    delicious passionfruitHang on to the taste of summer by growing your own passionfruit vine. If you act now you can be picking fruit next summer!

    If you’re a fruit lover, then passionfruit vines are a must-have for you! They are abundant producers capable of providing two main crops of delicious fruit a year – a summer crop that’s borne from spring flowers and, in warmer climates, a winter crop that follows autumn flowers. Passionfruit can be eaten fresh right off the vine, used to flavour desserts and drinks with its pulp, and can be easily frozen to be kept and supplied at a later date.

    The vines are also fast growing with a lush, deep green foliage and beautiful flowers that make them ideal for creating a bit of privacy to a space or covering a pergola to provide shade to the area. Passionfruit vines are also quick to crop too! You can expect the first fruit to produce within 12 months of planting in warmer areas, or a little longer in cooler, marginal areas.

    Read more here.

  • March 4, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Autumn Edibles

    autumn ediblesAutumn herb, fruit and vegetables planting guide by regional zone.

    Do you want to know what herbs, fruits or vegetables you can expect to grow in your garden during the Autumn months? We’ve grabbed the Regional Zone Planting Guide from About The Garden to make it easy for you locate your zone on the map (via About The Garden) and discover what edible plants you could be enjoying in your garden.

    Happy Autumn edible gardening!

    Subtropical

    (includes: South-east Qld & Northern NSW)

    HERBS – plant chervil, chicory, coriander, fennel, garlic bulbs, lavender, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rocket, sage, sorrel, rosemary, thyme, winter tarragon and yarrow.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLES – plant broad beans, broccoli, lettuce, onion, peas, radish, shallots, spinach, spring onion and turnip.

    Wet & Dry Tropical

    (includes: North Queensland, NT & WA)

    HERBS – plant basil, coriander, garlic, garlic chives, marjoram, oregano, parsley, thyme and winter tarragon.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLES – sow beans, beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, cauliflower, celery, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, melons, mustard, okra, onion, parsnip, potato, pumpkin, radish, rosella, silver beet, squash, sweet corn, sweet potato, tomato and zucchini.

    Dry Inland

    (includes: Arid or Outback areas)

    HERBS – plant chervil, chives, chicory, coriander, dill, fennel, garlic bulbs, lavender, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, sage, sorrel, rosemary, thyme, winter tarragon and yarrow.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLES – plant broad beans, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cauliflower, lettuce, onion, peas, radish, shallot, spinach, spring onion, tomato and turnip.

    Temperate

    (includes: Sydney, coastal NSW & Victoria)

    HERB – plant coriander, garlic bulbs, marjoram, oregano, parsley, thyme and winter tarragon.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLE – plant broad beans, English spinach, green beans and peas.

    Cool & Southern Tablelands

    (includes: Melbourne, Tasmania & cool highlands)

    HERBS – plant chives, coriander, garlic, lemongrass, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, shallots, tarragon and thyme.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLE – plant broad bean, beetroot, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, Chinese broccoli, Chinese cabbage, English spinach, leek, lettuce, onion, parsnip, potatoes, silver beet, swede and turnip.

    Mediterranean

    (includes: Adelaide & Perth)

    HERBS– plant chives, coriander, marjoram, oregano, mustard and parsley.

    FRUIT & VEGETABLE – plant citrus, avocado and olive trees by end of March. Sow broccoli, cabbage, broad beans, cauliflower, celery, English spinach, silver beet, lettuce and peas.

    Read more here.

  • March 2, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Autumn Flowers

    autumn flowersAutumn flowers planting guide by regional zone.

    Do you want to know what colour you can expect to grow in your garden during the Autumn months? We’ve grabbed the Regional Zone Planting Guide from About The Garden to make it easy for you locate your zone on the map (via About The Garden) and discover what colours you could be enjoying in your garden.

    Happy Autumn Gardening!

    Subtropical

    (includes: South-east Qld & Northern NSW)

    FLOWERS – sow ageratum, alyssum, candytuft, carnation, cineraria, coreopsis, cornflower, cyclamen, delphinium, dianthus, everlasting daisy, Iceland poppy, impatiens, marigolds, sweet pea and viola.

    Wet & Dry Tropical

    (includes: North Queensland, NT & WA)

    FLOWERS – sow ageratum, aster, balsam, carnation, celosia, chrysanthemum, cockscomb, coleus, cosmos, dahlia, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gaillardia, gazania, geranium, gerbera, impatiens, kangaroo paw, African marigold, French marigold, nasturtium, petunia, portulaca, rudbeckia, salvia, snapdragon, sunflower, torenia, verbena, wallflower and zinnia.

    Dry Inland

    (includes: Arid or Outback areas)

    FLOWERS – sow chrysanthemum, cockscomb, cosmos, dahlia, everlasting daisy, gazania, geranium, gerbera, impatiens, kangaroo paw, marigold, nasturtium, petunia, portulaca, rudbeckia, salvia, snapdragon, sunflower, torenia, verbena, wallflower and zinnia.

    Temperate

    (includes: Sydney, coastal NSW & Victoria)

    FLOWERS – plant alyssum, calendula, candytuft, carnation, cineraria, cornflower, cosmos, daisy, foxglove, lobelia, nasturtium, nemesia, pansy, poppy, primula, schizanthus, snapdragon, sweet pea and viola.

    Cool & Southern Tablelands

    (includes: Melbourne, Tasmania & cool highlands)

    FLOWERS – plant alyssum, aurora daisy, cineraria, cornflower, cyclamen, English daisy, French marigold, Iceland poppy, lobelia, lupin, pansy, polyanthus, primula, snapdragon, stock, strawflower, sweet pea and viola.

    Mediterranean

    (includes: Adelaide & Perth)

    FLOWERS – plant ageratum, alyssum, cineraria, cyclamen, forget-me-not, French marigold, Iceland poppy, lobelia, lupin, pansy, phlox, primula, stock and wallflower.

    Read more here.

  • February 18, 2021 in Uncategorized

    Stance Equitec Supplements

    Stance Equitec

    Stance EquitecStance Equitec supplements are made from natural and ethically sourced ingredients, are scientifically formulated and are designed to help your horse look, feel and perform their best.

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